The Pavilion at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania

Minolta XE with Lomochrome Metropolis

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After my last slightly disappointing results with my Minolta XE, I had a better experience a few weeks later on a couple of walks, one in our neighborhood and one to University City, mainly to take pictures of the still under construction of The Pavilion at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

I used Lomochrome Metropolis, a new film from Lomography, for the first time. I knew when I bought it that, according to their site, it “desaturates colors, mutes tones and makes contrasts pop.” I was curious what the results would be.

My results support that description which gave the images a unique look. I really liked how with three of the shots, the foreground was sharp and distinct while the background was faded given a nice contrast between the two.

The Pavilion at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
The Pavilion at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania

Lomochrome is rated for ISO 100-400 which was the first roll I’ve ever shot rated for a range like that.

On our first walk, I started shooting at ISO 100 for a few picures.

I then switched to ISO 400 and the sun started to set.

Lamp
Lamp

It’s hard to say if changing the ISO made a difference since the photos at 100 were taken only minutes before the ones at 400, and there’s no discernible differences.

For our walk to University City, I set it at 100 and left it there.

Cars and Graffiti
Cars and Graffiti
The Pavilion at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
The Pavilion at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania

Although I like the unique look of the Lomochrome Metropolis, I see limited use cases for it. Now that I have shot a roll with it, I know what the results are like so if I do get it again, I’ll have some idea of how I might want to shoot with it.

Lomography also has 110 and 120 versions of this film, and I might be more inclined to try one of those before committing before returning to the 35mm version.

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