Abandoned Building

Minolta Hi-Matic 11 with Ilford Delta 100

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I have gotten off to a slow start with film photography this year. I didn’t get my first roll developed until mid-March and only recently finished a 2nd roll.

As I had done with that first roll of film, I experimented with shooting one stop over-exposed. The main difference with this roll is that I was using black and white film, Ilford Delta 100. I used my Minolta Hi-Matic 11, set at ISO 50. I shot at this ISO on 2 occasions and then finished the roll at ISO 100 to see if there was any notable difference.

The first time was toward the end of March on a walk to the East Passyunk neighborhood. It was a chilly, gray, and windy day so I ended up taking only 7 photos.

Abandoned Building
Abandoned Building

We had a much nicer day a couple weeks later in early April. We took a walk to Old City to go to our favorite local stationery store, Omoi Zakka. I didn’t shoot many photos on that walk either but for the opposite reason. It was warm and sunny and I have overdressed. By the time we walked to our destination and did our shopping, I just wanted to get home so didn’t take any photos on the way back.

What Remains at Meg Saligman Studios
What Remains at Meg Saligman Studios

We went out the following weekend, and it was nice enough out (and I was dressed appropriately) that I was able to finish the roll. I decided to switch the ISO to 100 so I could compare the over-exposed speed with the box speed. As with my prior experiment, there wasn’t a significant difference. The highlights in a few of the above pictures seem a little bright, but they were taken on a very sunny day so it’s hard to say what difference the ISO setting made.

Roberts Center for Pediatric Research
Roberts Center for Pediatric Research
Building Decoration
Building Decoration

It’s a bit hard to decide given the small sample of 2 rolls of film, but based on what results I’ve gotten so far, I may be inclined to continue over-exposing color film but not black and white. There wasn’t much of a difference with either, but I would be more concerned with losing some shadows and contrast in black and white photos. Granted, I could always adjust for that in the editing stage, but I like keeping my editing of my film photos to a minimum.

One benefit of shooting at the lower ISO is that it provides a little more latitude for shooting at a wider aperture thus giving a bit of extra options for shallower depth of field. But given the slight variations in outcomes, it’s probably not providing that much latitude.

It’s been fun experimenting with these 2 rolls. Until I had done so, I never thought about shooting film at any ISO other than what was printed on the box!

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